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4 Home Care to Treat Overlapping Toes

Overlapping Toes
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Struggling with overlapping toes? Here are 4 ways you can treat them without visiting the doctor.

Overlapping toes is an informal name for a condition where one or more of your toes are partially or completely overlapped by one or more other toes. It can be caused by a number of things, including genetics, injuries, and even tight shoes. Overlapping toes can be moderate or severe, but over time, they usually cause some level of discomfort or pain.

If you’re experiencing calluses, corns, metatarsalgia, or other forms of pain and inflammation because of your overlapping toes, don’t worry — there are a number of treatment home treatment options you can try. Keep reading to learn the four best home treatment options for overlapping toes.

1. Comfortable Shoes

One of the most common non-genetic causes of overlapping toes is tight, improperly fitting shoes. After years of wearing shoes that squeeze your toes together, such as high heels or narrow loafers, your toes can become permanently misshapen. Wearing shoes that are too small can also cause corns, calluses, and other painful foot conditions.

If you think your shoes might be the cause of your overlapping toes, the first step is to invest in a pair of comfortable, well-fitting shoes. This means shoes that fit well and provide enough room for your toes to move around freely without being constricted. It’s also important to choose shoes with a wide toe box, as this will give your toes even more room to breathe. If you’re not sure what kind of shoes to buy, consult a podiatrist or other foot specialist.

2. Forefoot Support With Toe Separators

Toe separators are small devices that are placed between the toes to help stretch them out and keep them from rubbing together. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and can be made from gel, foam, silicone, or other materials.

Toe separators for overlapping toes are available for purchase online or at most drugstores. When choosing toe separators, it’s important to choose a size and material that is comfortable for you to wear. You may need to experiment with a few different types before you find the perfect fit.

In addition to realigning overlapping toes, toe separator benefits also include relieving pain and inflammation and preventing corns, calluses, and blisters from forming on the toes.

3. Toe Loops and Bandages

If you’re looking for an easier, more low-tech solution to your overlapping toe problem, you can try using toe loops or bandages. Toe loops are small pieces of fabric that loop around the toes and help hold them in place. Bandages, on the other hand, are strips of fabric that can be wrapped around the toe in a variety of ways.

Available in most regular drug stores, both of these options are great for forcing toes into a certain position and relieving friction and irritation. You can either wrap a toe individually to stop it from rubbing against another, or tie the overlapping toe to a nearby correctly positioned toe to hold it in place.

4. Insoles

While insoles probably aren’t the first thing that comes to mind when you think of fixing overlapping toes, they can actually be quite helpful. In addition to providing arch support and cushioning, insoles can also help to realign the toes and prevent them from rubbing together.

This is because they provide the proper support on your entire foot, which allows your toes to fall into their natural alignment rather than the misalignment that causes them to overlap. Over time, wearing insoles can help your toes reposition themselves and stay in the correct alignment.

Conclusion

If you’re dealing with overlapping toes, there are a number of home treatment options you can try. From comfortable shoes and insoles to toe separator, loops, and bandages there’s sure to be an option that works for you.

Of course, home treatments can only take you so far. If you’re not seeing major improvements, or if you’re not sure what treatment is right for you, contact your podiatrist for help.

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